Influence of site, storage and steaming on Eucalyptus nitens log-end splitting

Log-end splitting is one of the single most important defects in veneer logs. We show that log-end splitting in the temperate plantation species Eucalyptus nitens varies across sites and within-tree log position and increases with time in storage.

Abstract

Log-end splitting is one of the single most important defects in veneer logs because it can substantially reduce the recovery of veneer sheets. Eucalyptus nitens can develop log-end splits, but factors affecting log-end splitting in this species are not well understood. The present study aims to describe the effect of log storage and steaming on the development of log-end splitting in logs from different plantations and log positions within the tree. The study was conducted on upper and lower logs from each of 41 trees from three 20–22-year-old Tasmanian E. nitens plantations. Log-end splitting was assessed immediately after felling, after transport and storage in a log-yard, and just before peeling. A pre-peeling steam treatment was applied to half the logs. Site had a significant effect on splitting, and upper logs split more than lower logs with storage. Splitting increased with tree diameter breast height (DBH), but this relationship varied with site. The most rapidly growing site had more splitting even after accounting for DBH. No significant effect of steaming was detected. Log-end splitting varied across sites and within-tree log position and increased with time in storage.

 

 


Publication

Vega M, Hamilton M, Blackburn D, McGavin R, Baillères H, Potts B 2015. Influence of site, storage and steaming on Eucalyptus nitens log-end splitting. Ann. For. Sci.: 1-10. 10.1007/s13595-015-0496-3.

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